Flipping the Script: Integrating Bloom’s Taxonomy into Flipped Learning

Flipping the Script Integrating Bloom's Taxonomy into Flipped Learning By Leigh Anne Lankford

What is Flipped Learning and how is it different from Blended Learning?

The Flipped Classroom hit the education or classroom scene 10 or 15 years ago. Forward thinking teachers were trying to flip the way their students did homework and classwork by having the lecture or reading as homework and the application of the learning in the classroom. (As a parent, I really appreciated each teacher who made this effort!) I wrote an article on my personal blog in 2013 that discussed my exploration of this model.

To explore how to best use this model, we need to first define the difference between Blended Learning and Flipped Learning.

Blended Learning: In Blended Learning, the instructional designer or facilitator focuses on keeping the learner engaged by switching the delivery and interaction with content across different modalities.

Flipped Learning: In Flipped Learning, the instructional designer or facilitator focuses on what the learner is being asked to do before deciding the modality. Flipped Learning is a subset of blended learning but with a different twist.

How Does Bloom’s Taxonomy Fit In?

If you need a quick review of Bloom’s Taxonomy and using it for designing instruction, we have another article for you to see. For the purposes of this article, we will focus on the Cognitive Domain of Bloom’s Taxonomy but Flipped Learning can apply to all three domains. The basic way to determine how to design your flipped learning is to determine where your objectives fall in the domain. The lower levels of the cognitive domain – knowledge and understanding – represent content that only needs to be recognized and understood. Objectives on these two levels can be presented in one-way asynchronous formats or independent study such as a recorded lecture, eLearning, or reading assignments. The upper levels that involve application, analyzing, judging, synthesis, and creation would be presented in an in person or live virtual class that involves interaction with a facilitator or guide.

Flipping The Script Integrating Bloom'S Taxonomy Cognitive Domain Into Flipped Learning

Why Is This Flipped?

Think back to when you were a student. Quite often, you’d sit in a class such as math class. The teacher would lecture on the topic of the day such as multiplying fractions. The teacher would explain the concept, show some examples, and then assign homework to you. If you were lucky, you could remember the lecture after attending several other classes, participating in after school activities, and finally getting home to start homework. If you were unlucky, you had to re-read the chapter and ask your parents for help to finish the homework.

In the flipped model, your homework would happen prior to the classroom lesson. As independent study, you’d watch a recorded lecture online about multiplying fractions or maybe read an assigned chapter in preparation of the lesson. The objective for the independent study might be:

  • The student will be able to describe how to multiply fractions.

The next day in class, you’d work on the assigned problems with the teacher/guide there to help you with questions or difficulties. The objective for the guided work might be:

  • The student will be able to multiply two fractions together by multiplying the numerators and denominators,
  • The student will be able to simplify the answer.

As both a mom and a former student, this model would have completely changed homework time in my household.

Applying Flipped Learning to a Corporate Example:

How can this model be applied to training for corporate initiatives? Below is an example of sales training, but this model can be used for anything from new employee onboarding to configuring the computer in a soda machine.

Company X is building a sales training program for a new product line. The instructional design team is partnering with the sales facilitators to design the program. They have decided to go with a Flipped Learning Model. They have determined their overall learning objectives and have mapped out where they fall on Bloom’s Taxonomy to determine the high-level design. Based on the integration of Flipped Learning and Bloom’s Taxonomy, their design would look something like this:

The objectives selected for Independent Study include:

  • Learners will be able to recall the features and benefits of products Y & Z.
  • Learners will be able to identify the main competitors for products Y & Z.
  • Learners will be able to outline the pricing features for products Y & Z.
  • Learners will be able to label the correct codes in the CRM for products Y & Z.
  • Learners will be able to list common objections for products Y & Z.

These objectives are in the lower domains and can easily be handled through reading, eLearning, or other self-study methods.

The objectives selected for work in class with guidance include:

  • Learners will be able to model asking questions to determine the buyer’s needs.
  • Learners will be able to determine the best solution for the buyer.
  • Learners will be able to demonstrate overcoming objections in a roleplay.
  • Learners will be able to critique the performance of sales reps in a role play.
  • Learners will be able to create a proposal combining a solution with products Y & Z based on a mock RFP.

I recognize that many designers and facilitators already design in this fashion. Let this article serve as a friendly reminder for seasoned IDs to apply additional structure to your flipped design using Bloom. Newer designers can quickly learn to design impactful flipped learning experiences that save valuable classroom time by embracing the principles of flipped learning and leveraging the cognitive framework provided by Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Do you need to find instructional designers skilled in Flipped Learning design? Our industry-expert Relationship Managers can help! If you have more projects than people, we can provide you with the right instructional designer to start your project with confidence!

 

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Leighanne Lankford

Leighanne Lankford lives life outside of the lines. From walking on fire to rappelling down buildings, she lives by the mantra, "playing it safe isn’t good enough." In her 30 years as a Learning and Development practitioner, thought-leader, and now business owner, Leighanne has always pushed boundaries and done things her way.
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Leighanne Lankford lives life outside of the lines. From walking on fire to rappelling down buildings, she lives by the mantra, “playing it safe isn’t good enough.” In her 30 years as a Learning and Development practitioner, thought-leader, and now business owner, Leighanne has always pushed boundaries and done things her way.

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